Is India’s criticism on US an attempt to stop Washington from pursuing ‘Stick and Carrot’ policy?

New Delhi, April 14 (KMS): In a sharp response to US Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s recent comments on a rise in human rights abuses in India, Foreign Minister S Jaishankar referred to the United States and said “people” are entitled to have views about India’s policies but at the same time, New Delhi is “equally entitled” to have views about them [US].

The Indian Foreign Minister, in his first official reaction to the US statements, the other day, also appeared to refer to the hate attack on two Sikh men in New York.

At a joint news conference after the 2+2 dialogue of top US and Indian ministers on Monday, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken had said the US is monitoring some recent “concerning developments” in India a rise in “human rights abuses” by some government, police, and prison officials.

Mr Blinken was speaking with Mr Jaishankar, Defence Minister Rajnath Singh and US Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin by his side. Mr Jaishankar did not respond to the remarks at the conference but did so on Wednesday.

“Look, people are entitled to have views about us. But we are also equally entitled to have views about their views and about the interests, and the lobbies and the vote banks which drive that. So, whenever there is a discussion, I can tell you that we will not be reticent about speaking out,” Mr Jaishankar said at a press briefing, adding that the human rights issue was not a topic of discussion during the ministerial meeting.

“I would tell you that we also take our views on other people’s human rights situation, including that of the United States. So, we take up human rights issues when they arise in this country,” said the Foreign Minister.

The US Secretary of State’s comments on human rights in India were seen as a rare direct rebuke by Washington of New Delhi in the middle of discussions over India’s stand on Russia’s Ukraine invasion.

Mr Blinken had said: “We we are monitoring some recent concerning developments in India including a rise in human rights abuses by some government, police and prison officials”.

The US State Department, in its 2021 country report on Human Rights Practices published yesterday, had said that there were “credible reports” of human rights issues, including “extrajudicial killings by the government or its agents” in India.

Apparently Jaishankar’s rebuttal has been seen in the context of incidents of hate crimes against the Indian community in the US, which witnessed an increase by “200% in recent years”, but analysts believe that New Delhi’s unexpected reaction is an attempt to prevent the US from using a “Stick and Carrot” policy aimed at roping in India to toe the Washington’s line on Russia-Ukraine war.